Tag Archives: safety

How To Remove A Tick

15 May

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Well it’s that time a year again when you and your family are out and about more. And in my family that means rolling around in the dirt and grass…lol.Please keep yourself, family and animals safe by continuously checking for ticks. Be safe and have FUN this summer.

How To Remove a Tick:

Do a thorough body check for ticks after being outdoors

To remove a tick:
Using tweezers, grasp tick near the mouth parts, as close to skin as possible.
Pull tick in a steady, upward motion away from skin.
DO NOT use kerosene, matches, or petroleum jelly to remove tick.
Disinfect site with soap and water, rubbing alcohol or hydrogen peroxide.
Record date and location of tick bite. If rash or flu-like symptoms appear contact your health care provider immediately.

Remove ticks as soon as possible to reduce your risk of getting infected with Lyme disease or other tick-borne illnesses.

Questions? Call TCHD at 607-274-6604

Source: NYSDOH

Take precautions to help avoid ticks
Certain species of ticks — most notably the deer tick — carry Lyme Disease. The best precaution one can take against getting Lyme Disease is to limit exposure to ticks. Follow these steps when hiking or working in areas where ticks are most commonly found, such as woods and high grass:

Wear light colored clothing to spot ticks easier and brush off.
Tuck pants into socks and wear long sleeved tucked in shirts to prevent ticks from reaching the skin. Wear closed toed shoes.
Consider using insect repellent. Apply according to directions and use only the amount necessary. Keep out of reach of children and do not allow children to apply repellents.
Carefully check for ticks at the end of a day of outdoor activity. Also check children and pets and remove ticks promptly.
Stay on cleared, well traveled trails.
Keep lawns mowed and hedges trimmed. Clear brush and tall grass around the house. Clear leaf litter and the remains of perennials out of the garden in the fall.
Keep the ground under bird feeders clean so as not to attract small animals.
Locate the children’s swing sets and other play equipment in sunny, dry areas away from woods.
Seek medical attention as soon as possible if symptoms of Lyme Disease occur.

 

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Canning Safety

1 May

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All pictures taken by:Ronata Stapel

Using Boiling Water Canners

Elizabeth L. Andress, Ph.D.
Professor and Extension Food Safety Specialist,
Department of Foods and Nutrition

Most boiling water canners are made of aluminum or porcelain-covered steel; at least one stainless steel model is also available. Boiling water canners have fitted lids and removable racks that are either perforated or shaped wire racks. The canner must be deep enough so that at least one inch of briskly boiling water will be over the tops of jars during processing. Some boiling water canners do not have completely flat bottoms; these will not work well on smooth top ranges. The canner bottom should also be fairly flat for use on electric burners. Either a flat or ridged bottom may be used on a gas burner. To ensure uniform processing of all jars with an electric range, the canner should be no more than 4 inches wider in diameter than the element on which it is heated. (When centered on the burner or element, the canner should not extend over the edge of the burner or element by more than 2 inches on any side.) Before canning on a smooth top range, check the range manufacturer’s advice on suitability for canning and recommended maximum canner size for specific burners.

Follow these steps for successful boiling water canning:

(Read through all the instructions before beginning.)

1. Before you start preparing your food, place canner rack in the bottom of a boiling water canner. Fill the canner half full with clean warm water for a canner load of pint jars. For other sizes and numbers of jars, you will need to adjust the amount of water so it will be 1 to 2 inches over the top of the filled jars.

2. Center the canner over the burner and preheat the water to 140 degrees F. for raw-packed foods and to 180 degrees F. for hot-packed foods. You can begin preparing food for your jars while this water is preheating.

3. Load filled jars, fitted with lids and ring bands, into the canner one at a time, using a jar lifter. When moving jars with a jar lifter, make sure the jar lifter is securely positioned below the neck of the jar (below the ring band of the lid). Keep the jar upright at all times. Tilting the jar could cause food to spill into the sealing area of the lid.

If you have a shaped wire rack that has handles to hold it on the canner sides, above the water in the canner, you can load jars onto the rack in the raised position and then use the handles to lower the rack with jars into the water.

4. Add more boiling water, if needed, so the water level is at least one inch above the jar tops. Pour the water around the jars and not directly onto them. For process times over 30 minutes, the water level should be 2 inches above the jars.

5. Turn the heat setting to its highest position, cover the canner with its lid and heat until the water boils vigorously.

6. Set a timer (after the water is boiling) for the total minutes required for processing the food.

7. Keep the canner covered for the process time. The heat setting may be lowered as long as a gentle but complete boil is maintained for the entire process time.

8. Add more boiling water during the process, if needed, to keep the water level above the jar tops. Pour the water around the jars and not directly onto them.

9. If the water stops boiling at any time during the process, turn the heat on its highest setting, bring the water back to a vigorous boil, and begin the timing of the process over, from the beginning (using the total original process time).

10. When the jars have been processed in boiling water for the recommended time, turn off the heat and remove the canner lid. Wait 5 minutes before removing jars to allow the canner contents to settle. This waiting period is not required for safety of the food when using USDA or University of Georgia processing times, however.

RONATA NOTE: I’ve never done the wait time and had a problem. I always have so much too can to wait…lol.

11. Using a jar lifter, remove the jars one at a time, being careful not to tilt the jars. Carefully place them directly onto a towel or cake cooling rack, leaving at least one inch of space between the jars during cooling. Avoid placing the jars on a cold surface or in a cold draft.

RONATA NOTE: If you don’t have a canning lifter you can you tongs.

12. Let the jars sit undisturbed while they cool, from 12 to 24 hours. Do not tighten ring bands on the lids or push down on the center of the flat metal lid until the jar is completely cooled.

13. Remove ring bands from sealed jars. Put any unsealed jars in the refrigerator and use first.

14. Wash jars and lids to remove all residues.

15. Label jars and store in a cool, dry place out of direct light.

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